I Could Not Care Less About February Baseball Injuries

I could not care less about February baseball injuries.  (Side note: I cannot stand when people say “I could care less” when they mean “I could not care less”.)  Allow me to repeat myself.  I could not care less about February baseball injuries.

I make this point because it is apparently a huge story that Mets’ infielder Jed Lowrie is heading for an MRI for soreness in the back of his knee.  Notice that today’s date is February 24.  The Mets’ first regular-season game takes place on March 28.  Thus, we are five weeks from the start of the regular season.  Do I care that Jed Lowrie might miss a few weeks of Spring Training?  Of course not.  As I have discussed in the past, I could not care less about preseason games in any sport.  My main goal for any preseason is to have all of my team’s players be healthy when the regular season starts.

Image result for jed lowrie mets

Therefore, if we ultimately find out that Jed Lowrie needs surgery and is going to miss several months of the season, then we can then make a big deal out of his injury.  However, assuming that a severe injury is not the case, I view any time that Lowrie misses in the spring as time during which he will not suffer a season-ending injury.  Additionally, the guy has been in the league for more than 10 years.  He does not need five weeks of Spring Training games.  He will probably actually benefit by having a shorter Spring Training, in that he will likely feel better rested during the season.  Therefore, to summarize, I am in no way worried that Lowrie’s knee issue will have a negative effect on the Mets’ season.

Anyway, you might be wondering why some people (mainly on New York sports radio) are making a mountain out of the molehill that is Jed Lowrie’s injury.  I believe there are two main reasons for this:

  • Some people are incredibly eager for baseball season and thus are willing to make anything baseball-related a big story. I am not one of these people.  I would say that older people (so I guess this is the second time I am being ageist in a post) hold “pitchers and catchers” and “the start of Spring Training” in higher regard than younger people do.  This regard likely stems from the days when the World Series ended in mid-October instead of early November and when there was not 24-hour baseball coverage all offseason long.  Therefore, in a bygone era; to have any baseball coverage in mid-February, after four months of zero baseball, was a big deal.  Nowadays, baseball fans can find baseball coverage all the time from early November through the start of the next season.  Therefore, it is no longer as big a deal (at least to me) that teams are primed to start playing five weeks of meaningless games featuring primarily people who will spend the regular season in the minors.  No, for me (and for many others who are 37 years old or younger), the end of February means that March Madness is right around the corner.  I am also pumped that the stretch run to the Stanley Cup Playoffs takes place in March.  Yes, I will be excited for MLB Opening Day when it arrives, but you can spare me the Spring Training games and obsessive discussion about minor preseason injuries.

 

  • There are many “Woe is me” Mets fans who LOVE to wallow in their own sorrow. As a Mets fan myself, I cannot stand these people.  These are the fans who are saying, “Same old Mets.  It is only February, and guys are getting hurt.”  To quote the venerable Don LaGreca, these fans are “in love with their own sadness”.  These fans would rather be miserable than have good things happen to the Mets.  These are the fans who will cite the 1992 Bobby Bonilla signing and 1996 Carlos Baerga trade as reasons why the 2018 Cano trade (which I happen to love) is a bad move.  These are the fans who blame the Mets’ disappointing 2018 season on injuries, even though the Mets did not suffer considerably more games lost to injury (to quality players) than the average team did.  These are the fans who view the 2015 season as a negative because the team lost the World Series.  These are the fans who rue the Mets’ “bad luck” of the past five years while casually ignoring the fact that the Mets rode impeccable health (especially among their pitching staff) to the 2015 World Series in the team’s only “real” (aka “beyond the Wild-Card Game) playoff appearance over that stretch.   OK, I will stop there, because I would someday like to write a full article on “Woe is me” Mets fans.  I do not want to steal too much of future Mike’s thunder.

 

Oh, one more thing I should mention.  While I am a big fan of the Jed Lowrie signing; if he were to miss the entire 2019 season, how much would his absence hurt the team?  If the answer is “a lot”, then the team is not very good as it is.  Fortunately, I would argue that the Mets can withstand a Lowrie injury.  With Cano, Rosario, Frazier, Alonso, d’Arnaud, Nimmo, Conforto, Lagares, McNeil, and TJ Rivera; the Mets have depth for their non-pitcher/catcher positions.  Lowrie is a nice player, but the Mets can afford to be without him for a while….but why am I wasting any time talking about this February injury?

Image result for mets cano

I could not care less about February baseball injuries.  It is February 21; let us focus on Zion, “Bracketology”, and what the Devils are going to do at the Trade Deadline.

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