Category Archives: Entertainment

Meet the One Person in America Who Likes the MNF Announcing Crew

This year, ESPN completely overhauled its Monday Night Football announcing team, as the network handed duties over to play-by-play announcer Joe Tessitore and analysts Jason Witten and Anthony “Booger” McFarland.  We did not have to wade too deep into the 2018 season for NFL fans across the United States to begin ripping this announcing trio.  It seems that football fans have decided that this announcing team is not ready for prime time.  Well, I have come across one person who actually likes this crew of announcers, and that person is yours truly.  Yes, I admit it – I enjoy Tessitore, Witten, and Booger.  Before you have me committed to a mental institution, please allow me to explain myself.

When I analyze an announcing team, I ask myself the following questions:

  • Does the play-by-play announcer do a good job describing the play?
  • Does the play-by-play announcer have a good voice for TV?
  • Do the analysts have serviceable voices for TV?
  • Are the analysts are able to dissect a play that has just happened in a way that educates me but does not feel “over my head”?
  • Do the announcers discuss the most important storylines of the game at the appropriate times?
  • Do the announcers converse comfortably with each other?
  • Do the announcers avoid embellishment, exaggeration, and self-fabricated storylines?

 

Very simply, the more “Yes” responses I can give to the questions above, the better the announcing team.  In terms of the MNF team, I am actually able to answer “Yes” to all seven questions above.  Allow me to explain, question by question.

 

  • I believe that Tessitore notes everything that is happening in a comfortable way. He does not embellish anything to try to put himself above the moment.  His voice rises and falls appropriately, based upon the moments he experiences.

 

  • Tess has a great, deep announcing voice.
Image result for joe tessitore monday night football
Image via USA Today
  • This is where most people will start to disagree with me. I think that Witten and McFarland have serviceable TV voices.  Their voices are not James Earl Jones-level great, but, for analysts, all I need is “serviceable”.  In other words, their voices need to avoid being Jerry Glanville-level annoying.  (Yes, I realize that most of you college students will have to Google “Jerry Glanville”, and some of you will even have to Google “James Earl Jones”.)  Anyway, it has become very easy to mock Jason Witten for the long pauses he tends to take mid-sentence.  I do not deny that these pauses exist, but I do not find that they hurt Witten’s ability to make points.  His pauses are his thing.  The guy played an entire NFL career and never missed games due to injury.  If the sole repercussion of Witten’s 15 years of NFL collisions is that he pauses mid-sentence, I can live with it.

 

  • The “Booger”-mobile is something that I initially thought would not work, but I have actually enjoyed it. I feel that the combination of Witten in the press box and Booger at field level do a great job of analyzing plays immediately after they happen.  I am not going to compare these guys to Cris Collinsworth nor Tony Romo, as those are the best two analysts in the business.  However, just because there are people better does not make the MNF trio bad.  In fact, it is weird to me that people’s bar for judging these announcers seems to be at the elite level.  Have you ever watched any announcing team below the networks’ top teams?  I covered some of this a few weeks ago, but there is plenty not to like about those announcing teams.  Furthermore, even if you use a higher bar for national announcing teams than for other teams; I ask you to remember Troy Aikman, Jon Gruden, and Tony Kornheiser.  It is fun to mock Aikman, but I would say he is on a par with the Witten/Booger duo (which is a compliment only when it comes from me).  As of the other two guys, I put Witten and Booger well above them.  I will return to this discussion in a bit.
Image result for booger mobile
Image via The Big Lead
  • As I also discussed a few weeks ago, it is very annoying when all of the viewers at home are discussing a different aspect of a game or play than the announcers are. For example, an announcer might be analyzing whether or not a receiver has kept his two feet inbounds, while everyone at home can see that the ball came loose to render the “feet” discussion irrelevant.  The MNF team successfully avoids this awkward scenario.

 

  • My favorite thing about the MNF team is that Witten and Booger often disagree with each other but do so in a respectful manner. The classic example came during Week 3’s Pittsburgh/Tampa Bay contest; as Witten argued that Le’Veon Bell was wrong for holding out while Booger argued that Bell was correct.  Both analysts provided compelling cases for their sides, and the two announcers were civil the whole time.  We are used to seeing forced laughter between broadcast partners (which does sometimes happen with the MNF team too) and especially between studio hosts on FOX and CBS.  We are used to announcers mindlessly agreeing with each other about everything.  (Aikman says “You’re exactly right, Joe.” in his sleep.)  Therefore, it is refreshing to hear differing opinions within the same broadcast.

 

  • For those who forget this question read, “Do the announcers avoid embellishment, exaggeration, and self-fabricated storylines?” In other words, do the announcers avoid doing the main thing that ESPN always does???  Ironically this announcing team does.  For years, we were saddled with Jon Gruden singing the praises of guys like Preston Parker and Blake Bortles.  We heard him say that Jarvis Landry is as good as OBJ.  We heard Gruden say, “I like this guy” about at least 75 players per team per game.    Prior to that, we had Tony Kornheiser try to do three hours of PTI during every MNF game.  That meant that Kornheiser would awkwardly try to weave 3 or 4 storylines like “Are the Cowboys the most popular team in America?” into every minute of every game.  That stuff worked on PTI.  It did not work during games.   You are announcing a football game; you do not need to fabricate storylines.  The game presents its own storylines.  Kornheiser did not get it.

 

Who does get it though?  Joe Tessitore, Jason Witten, and Booger McFarland.  Therefore, I would like to congratulate ESPN.  Even a blind squirrel catches a nut once in a while, and that is the case with ESPN and this announcing team.

 

Every NFL Broadcast Needs a Young Guy on the Staff to Keep the Old Announcers from Repeating Nonsense

We watched a thrilling Bears/Giants game Sunday.  It was easily one of the more enjoyable Giants games I have ever watched, even though the Giants are going nowhere this season.  That said, FOX’s analyst Charles Davis made me realize that NFL broadcasts need to employ an additional person.  They need to employ a football fan under the age of 40 whose sole job is to notify the production team when an analyst makes a point that everyone under 40 knows is wrong.  This plan will keep the announcer from belaboring that point.  I am not trying to single out Charles Davis here.  Plenty of veteran announcers (see “Aikman, Troy”) fall into this same category.

You are probably wondering, “What did Charles Davis say today to make you want to write this post?”  It was actually two things.  Let us start with the main one…

If you watched the game, you know that the momentum-changing play was Saquon Barkley’s 3rd-and-23 run at the end of the first half.  Instead though, Charles Davis focused over and over and over again on the fact that the Bears called timeout before this run.  When the Bears called timeout, there were 16 seconds on the clock with the Giants facing 3rd and 23 from their own 30.  The Bears’ only mistake was that they let time (I am not sure exactly how many seconds) tick off the clock between the previous play and this timeout.  Anyone under 40 watching this game knows that the Bears should have called timeout immediately after second down (a sack of Eli).  This way, assuming the Bears create a stop on 3rd down, the Bears can call another timeout and have a chance to block a punt or throw up a Hail Mary.  Somehow, neither play-by-play announcer Kevin Burkhardt nor Davis noted at any time before the timeout that the Bears should want to call a timeout.  Everyone knows that 3rd-and-23 is supposed to be an automatic 3rd-down stop.  Thus, the Bears did the automatic thing by calling timeout.  It is a basic thing. There is nothing noteworthy at all about it, yet Davis harped on this point over and over and over again for the rest of the game.  Saquon made an amazing run.  That was the story, not the timeout.  Had FOX gone with my suggestion, someone could have told Davis after his first comment about the timeout, “everyone knows the timeout made sense.  Focus on the Saquon run.”

Image result for charles davis and kevin burkhardt
Image via Charles Davis

The second Davis faux-pas deals with the classic “down by 10 with 2 minutes to go” saga.  Roughly 10 years ago, older announcers could not yet deal with the concept that it sometimes makes sense to kick a field goal, then do an onside kick, and then go for a touchdown.  Now, older announcers have caught on to the concept, but they overuse it.  The Bears used a big play to arrive at 1st and Goal with 1:28 to play.  From that point on, Davis said repeatedly, “The Bears don’t need to go for a touchdown here.  They are going to have to get a field goal at some point anyway.”

Of course, he is not wrong that a field goal there keeps the Bears’ hope for a win alive.  However, anyone under 40 watching that game knows that the primary storyline at that point is: If you have made it to first and goal, you really really really really want to get the touchdown there.  After all, to get an onside kick is tough enough.  To then march downfield for a touchdown is even tougher.  Thus, you do not want to sacrifice a goal-to-go scenario by settling for a field goal.  The main goal there is to score a touchdown, so that, in the event of a successful onside kick, the Bears need only a field goal to tie.  Plus, they could then win the game on a touchdown.

Granted, we know that the Bears did ultimately kick a field goal on 4th down.  Once 4th down arrived, Davis was justified in saying it was OK for the Bears to settle for a field goal.  Yes, the Bears did score a touchdown after the onside kick, but, if they had scored a TD on that first of the two drives, perhaps they would have won the game with another regulation TD.  The moral of the story is that anyone under 40 was thinking that Davis was off-base with the “The Bears can kick a FG here, since they need a FG at some point anyway” storyline.  Let us get someone on the production team to tell Davis to stop repeating that comment unless it is fourth down.

At this point, you might be wondering if today was the first day that this thought entered my head.  Definitely not.  Over the years, here are the most common cases where broadcast teams could use a young mind in the production staff:

  • 4th Downs: Plain and simple. If you are over 45, you are Troy Aikman, or you are both; you think that teams should never ever go for it on 4th down unless it’s 4th and goal from the 1 with 1 second remaining and your team down by 7.  (And even then, Aikman might advise a field goal.)  Needless to say, young people recognize that, in the modern era of crazy amounts of offense, going for it on 4th down is often the right move.  In fact, the second-quickest way to out yourself as an old person is by saying, “You always wanna take the points”.  Of course, the quickest way to out yourself is to say either “The Twitter” or “The Facebook”. Additionally, young minds realize that, if you go for it on 4th down inside the other team’s 20 and do not convert, you still force the other offense to travel further than if you kick a field goal.  When a team misses a conversion deep into opposing territory, no 40+-year-old announcer has ever noted that the team benefited thereafter from forcing a three-and-out and receiving good field position after the punt.
Image result for troy aikman in booth
Image via Fox Sports
  • Space-time continuum: This one overlaps with #1. If a team passes up a 1st-quarter field goal, goes for the first down, and does not convert; you cannot say with 2 minutes left in the game, “The Giants are down by 2, but, if they had only kicked that field goal in the first quarter, they would be winning now.”  Back to the Future came out in 1985, yet older announcers know nothing about the space-time continuum.  If you change what happens early in a game, everything that happens thereafter changes too.  The under-40 production guy would know this.

 

  • Committing to the running game: Older announcers are always bewildered when teams with strong running games deviate from the run when down by 21 in the second half. “I don’t know why the Cardinals are abandoning the run here.  They told us in production meetings that they wanted to control the running game.”  Wanna know who does know?  Young people.  Teams do not run the ball when down 21 in the second half.

 

  • “You’re on the road/at home/going nowhere this season, you might as well go for it here.” – Again, I have never heard someone under 40 base a punt/FG/go-for-it decision on whether a team is home or away. I swear these comments are the small talk of old announcers.  We are annoyed when people walk tell us, “Monday again?  Oh, the weekend goes by too fast.”  Mindless talk, just like this “home/road” garbage.  Herm Edwards was right that every coach “plays to win the game”.  Your record does not dictate whether or not to go for it on 4th  Neither does home/away.  Your talent and the game situation do.  Speaking of which…

Image result for herm edwards you play to win the game gif

  • Going for two: For older announcers, going for two is like new technology, new rappers, and difficult-to-pronounce names combined. It is an absolute trainwreck.  It has always been a disaster, but, now that strong offensive teams have realized that, with extra points being less sure things (since being moved back), it can make sense to go for two all the time.  This makes things especially tough for older announcers.  “Why wouldn’t you just take the sure point here???” is something they say in their sleep at this point.  Additionally, when a team is down 15 late in a game and scores a TD, you know that an old announcer’s head is ready to explode if the team goes for 2 after the first TD.  “Why are they going for two here????  They don’t need to go for it yet.  If they miss it here, the game is over.”  As a counterpoint, young people present math.  You might as well go for two first, so that, if you miss it, you know you have to find a way to score twice more.  Lastly, in terms of 2-point conversions.  If you are down 7 and score a touchdown at the end of regulation, your decision is simple.  If you are the favorite, you kick the extra point and take your chances in OT.  If you are the underdog, you go for two.  It’s the basic “NCAA Basketball Tournament” premise.  There is no way UMBC would have beaten UVA in a Best-of-7 last year, but UMBC was able to win a Best-of-1.  If you are the underdog, your chances improve as you decrease the sample size.  Thus, you would rather beat the favorite over one play than over multiple overtime possessions.

 

Guess who understands this?  Young football fans.  Thus, NFL broadcasts, the time has come to put young guys in the production staff to make sure your announcers do not keep harping on silly points.

The Rock’s New Show Makes Me Want To Run Through A Nail-Ridden Brick Wall

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson has a new show coming out on NBC called “The Titan Games”. Simply put, it’s a series of challenges that test these men and women physically as well as mentally as they try to knock off one of six other “titans” that they compete against throughout the show.

I have a feeling that when I watch roughly the first 14 seconds of this show I’m going to want to workout non-stop for the following 48 hours. There are going to be multiple contestants moving 80 feet tall steel beams with the same amount of struggle I exert to throw snow over my shoulder. I plan on feeling embarrassingly weak from the moment I turn this show on…and I love it.

Dwayne Johnson is in one of those annoying life situations where everything he touches now makes hundred of millions of dollars. It’s like, he doesn’t even need an original idea and these networks are jamming their annual profit miles deep into his pockets. And honestly, kudos to The Rock and his PR team for keeping him in the “absurdly strong and overwhelmingly vascular” club of actors and actresses after he dressed up as the Tooth Fairy for an entire movie. The fact that he now has a show about the strongest and toughest people in the world after pulling that stunt is truly something to marvel at.

Image result for dwayne johnson the tooth fairy

Anyway, back to the show. The best way I can describe “The Titan Games” is it being the real-life version of the Salty Spitoon (RIP Stephen Hillenburg) with The Rock as the bouncer. If that doesn’t make you want to sit your out-of-shape ass down every Thursday starting January 3rd, then I honestly don’t know what will.

And what better time to start a show about people who have their shit together physically and mentally than January 3rd, a day into “The Resolutioners” prime time. Absolutely genius. People will be flocking to the gym like a bunch of drunk college kids surround the guy who brought Chick-Fil-A to the party. It’ll be madness, and guys in the demographic of 18-24 will be attempting tire flips through flaming hula hoops daily at their local New York Sports Club while the older men in their 40s reclaim their youth by attempting to bench press 225 again like they did during their high school football years. Even if you don’t work out, go to the gym the day after this show premieres because it’ll be an incredible sight.

There’s also supposed to be a lot of great storylines to follow throughout the series, so I hope this is one of those shows that sticks around for a while. I’ll definitely be tuning in next month.

Creed 2 Comes Out in a Week

I was always a big fan of the Rocky movies, and Creed just took everything about the Rocky movies and made it 100 times better. Michael B. Jordan is the best lead actor the series has ever seen (no offense to Sylvester Stallone), Stallone himself puts in his best performance in Creed, and modern technology made the fight scenes much better than in the older movies. All that being said, Rocky IV is also one of my favorite movies of all time. I mean, Rocky going to Soviet Russia on Christmas Day, in the middle of the Cold War, to fight a roided-up Soviet Ivan Drago, who he watched kill his close friend Apollo Creed in the ring? What kind of storyline could match that? How about Apollo’s son Adonis fighting Drago’s son? Well, that’s exactly what we get with Creed 2.

Throw in the fact that Adonis’ girlfriend, Bianca’s hearing is still deteriorating, and the two now have a child together, there is so much more on the line in this movie than the original. The original is already my favorite movie! Creed exceeded my expectations in every single way. I’ve never been more excited for a movie, next week can’t come soon enough.

 

Creed II Has No Chance of Not Being the Best Movie of All-Time

Creed II is the movie you didn’t know you needed until it was announced last week. The long-awaited sequel for Creed, the Rocky series spin-off film from 2015, is set to be released on November 21 of this year. Here’s the trailer:

If you found yourself intensely shadow boxing while watching this, you’re with the rest of the world. When I finished watching Creed for the first time, my immediate thought was this has to be up there with the best of the Rocky movies, and competes with Rocky IV for the top spot.

Then…Warner Bros. pulled a Family Feud-Steve Harvey on us and said “GIVE ME CREED. GIVE ME ROCKY IV” and made them meet at the center with the question being “What is going to be the best movie in the history of ever?” Survey says…Creed II.

The only thing that could make this movie any better is if Rocky and Ivan Drago got in the ring and went at it for Round II, like some sort of remake of Grudge Match (that’s when Stallone and DeNiro fought each other in an actual movie at 70 years old). The last time we saw them together Rocky pretty much ended the Cold War with this speech:

Things are heating up again with Russia, and don’t think it’s a coincidence that Rocky is coming to the rescue again. Somehow Sylvester Stallone is going to finish this movie as  the new US Ambassador to Russia.

On a more serious note, Michael B. Jordan is a great actor and I’m excited to see where the plot heads towards. We know Rocky was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, but also that he was receiving treatment last movie. It seems like in the trailer he was in a lot of the film and looking relatively healthy, so maybe he gets better? Is there another plotline that is going to be developed in order to keep things going, or is this expected to be the final piece of the franchise? Stallone had said in the past, “There’s more to go. I would like to follow this character until eventually he’s an angel.” Does this happen in Creed II?

There’s a lot of questions that I want the answers to. Going to the movies is an absolute sham nowadays, but there is no part of me that cares about dropping $20 to go see this movie in theaters that weekend.  I’d expect the same from all other Rocky fans out there.

 

 

The Most Miserable Person in the World

This year’s MLB All-Star Game was a rather ho-hum affair.  We are less than a week removed from the game, and most MLB fans could not today recite a single memorable occurrence from that game.  Meanwhile, the most newsworthy All-Star Game occurrence was the revelation that Milwaukee Brewers reliever Josh Hader had tweeted misogynistic and homophobic things while he was in high school.

First off, obviously it is extremely inappropriate for a person to make such tweets.  That said, who is the person who dug up these tweets on the day of the All-Star Game?  There are only two possibilities, one commendable and one deplorable:

Possibility #1) A vindictive ex-girlfriend or ex-friend was “getting back” at Hader.  I really hope this was the case.  Maybe there was a time where Hader cheated on a girl, and she decided to get her revenge when he was on the biggest stage of his life.  Maybe Hader “stole” a girl from a friend, and the friend similarly decided to get revenge during the All-Star Game.  Either way, if the aggrieved party was aware that a) these tweets existed and b) Hader has/had a promising baseball career, said party might want to wait until the perfect time to unveil those tweets to the world.  This way, the party could maximize the damage to Hader’s career.  The perfect time was, of course, during the All-Star Game.  Very few people outside Milwaukee knew much about Josh Hader before Tuesday.  However, to reveal that an All-Star had once made those inappropriate tweets would be a big story, even if the name “Josh Hader” was not exactly a household name.  Therefore, the All-Star Game was the perfect time to release the tweets and thus to give Hader the most notoriety.

Image result for josh hader all star
Photo via Sporting News

Possibility #2) One of the most miserable people in the world dug up this tweet from the past and released it on Tuesday for the sole purpose of making Hader miserable.  Again, the tweets are inexcusable, but, as a high-school teacher, I also know that high-schoolers say, do, and tweet dumb things from time to time.  The whole point of going to school is to learn – not only academically, but also socially – so that one can live a responsible adult life.  I have taught many students who matured greatly over their high-school careers, and the last thing I would want to see is to have their careers tarnished by stupid things the students tweeted while they were in high school.

At the same time, I am sure there are miserable people out there who pore over the social-media accounts of every person who suddenly gains even a modicum of fame.  This way, these scavengers can try to wreck the person’s fame, even if the person is a good person.  By all accounts, Josh Hader has been an upstanding adult who tweeted inappropriate things as a high-schooler.  Why try to wreck the guy now, unless you are a miserable, miserable person?

If “Possibility #2” is the correct answer, then the person who uncovered these tweets surely drives in the left lane of the highway at 50 miles per hour and uses a urinal next to the only other occupied urinal when there is a line of open urinals.  What a miserable, miserable person.

“Jersey Shore – Family Reunion” Was a Delight…Let’s Do It Again in 2023!

This week, MTV’s “Jersey Shore – Family Reunion” came to a close, and I am going to miss it.  The funny thing is that, when this season – essentially the seventh season of “Jersey Shore” (albeit with a 6-year gap between Seasons 6 and 7) – began, I did not think I would get into it.  By the time Season 6 had finished 6 years ago, I was fairly certain that the show had run its course.  Therefore, I figured that I would watch the first episode of “Family Vacation” for nostalgic purposes, and then I would stop.  This would not be the case.

Let us now flash back to the very beginning of the show, “Jersey Shore”.  Before its premiere in December of 2009, I had heard rumblings that this show was in the works, but I had not given it a moment of thought.  Then, a few episodes into Season 1, my then-girlfriend and her friend were watching these eight Italians (most of whom were not actually from New Jersey) on TV.  These alleged “New Jerseyans” were put in a house on the Seaside Heights boardwalk, and I did not know what to expect.  The first glimpse of the show that I saw was Vinny and Pauly D on a club floor, “fighting the beat”.

Image result for jersey shore season 1

I made fun of this line, but it did not keep me from watching.  I proceeded to watch the remainder of that episode and all other episodes that season.  I thought that Pauly D and Vinny were intentionally hilarious, while The Situation was unintentionally hilarious.  The Sammi/Ronnie drama was captivating, and Snooki was always good for laughs when she would drunkenly fall down.  These people were all twentysomethings, and I was 28 years old.  There had honestly never been a time when I truly enjoyed clubs; if you know me, you can imagine that clubs are not exactly my scene.  That said, it was fun to live vicariously through these guys and their tales of “grenades” (2010 was a big year for these; because, not only did “Jersey Shore” finish its first season, but Bruno Mars also released his great song, “Grenade”.) and “t-shirt time”.  Never being one to “pick girls up” at clubs, I was fascinated by this guido world.

As the show progressed through six seasons, two major things changed.  The first involves the guy who owned the t-shirt store, the place of employment for the “Jersey Shore” cast.  For any young readers, you might find it silly that these eight people who were cast on what Bill Simmons once called “Guido Real World” also had to work at a t-shirt store while on the show.  What you must understand though is that, yes, it was actually incredibly silly.  The cast members would show up drunk to work, and the store owner would seem mad at them.  Of course, his store was receiving free publicity, so he could not really be THAT mad.  However, as the show progressed, it seemed liked this guy stopped trying to act mad.  Instead, he would always have a “sh!t-eating grin” as he tried to reprimand the workers.  By Seasons 3, 5, and 6 (the remaining seasons that actually took place at the Jersey Shore), this gentleman knew that he was making a ridiculous amount of money off these talentless individuals.  How could he be mad at the eight people responsible for his presumable mansion, Ferrari, and yacht?

Image result for jersey shore season 1 t shirt store

Anyway, the second change that happened to the show was much more vital to the premise of the show.  The cast morphed from being nobodies in Season 1 to being megastars by Season 5.  In Season 1, the show achieved its premise of letting us watch these random people try to get strangers to “come back to the hot tub”.  These eight random people were no more recognizable to the other clubgoers than anyone else was.  However, by Season 5, nobody was allowed anywhere near the cast.  There were countless camera shots of the cast on the Seaside Heights boardwalk, as TV viewers could see spectators roped off far in the distance.  Nobody was allowed near these stars anymore.  This is why I started to lose interest in the show.  As with most reality shows, the show’s premise worked well when nobody knew the stars but fell apart once the stars had become too famous.

That is why the show’s 6-year hiatus did the viewers good.  We did not really need another season of trying to force the square peg of these massive celebrities into the round hole of having them try to hook up anonymously with strangers like in Season 1.  Therefore, with the 5-year gap, the cast was able to age 20 years (it seems).  Snooki and J-Woww had kids; Angelina and J-Woww had plastic surgery done on everything; Vinny stopped eating carbs; Ronnie has a kid on the way; and The Situation no longer drinks but might be heading to jail.  A lot of “life” happened for these people over the five years, and that made for a very entertaining season this go-round with “Family Vacation” (cast in a Miami house).

During this season, the cast admitted to having grown up.  The house members poked fun at each other on a regular basis, especially making fun of The Situation for his tax evasion.  Yes, these individuals went to clubs, but they were no longer trying to “pick up” people of the opposite sex.  Well, they were not supposed to do so, but Ronnie did bring some girls back to the hot tub even though he was in a relationship.  Tisk, tisk.  At the same time, Pauly D remained the best part of the show.  The guy is always happy; it is like he is perpetually covered in the “good slime” from Ghostbusters II.  He is even able to feign surprise when he is hired to DJ big-time gigs, even though he is probably the most famous DJ in the country.

Anyway, when the show reached its finale on Thursday night, JWoww led a discussion about how the cast should meet up again every few years.  I am sure that was a not-too-subtle way of hinting that MTV should do “Jersey Shore” reunions every five years or so.  If that is her plan, I am 100% on-board.  I would gladly watch one season of “Jersey Shore” every five years.  Let’s make it happen.  I expect the next reunion in 2023.